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Rugby Support

“I’VE BEEN USING BAUERFEIND KNEE BRACES SINCE 2011.”

Digby Ioane, Australian Wallaby 2007-2013.

Digby Ioane uses the GenuTrain P3

Playing rugby at any level brings with it a risk of knee injury. While rugby requires a lot of finesse and strategy it is a contact sport and the additional strain on your joints can take it’s toll. Wearing a Bauerfeind brace or knee support can minimise your chances of injury by providing enhanced stability, protection and medical-grade compression.

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

How can I prevent or avoid a knee injury while playing rugby?

Playing rugby at any level brings with it a risk of knee injury. While rugby requires a lot of finesse and strategy it is a contact sport and the additional strain on your joints can take it's toll. Wearing a Bauerfeind brace or knee support can minimise your chances of injury by providing enhanced stability, protection and medical-grade compression.

Should I see a doctor about knee pain when playing rugby?

If you have knee pain that persists for more than a few weeks, then it is recommended you see your doctor or physiotherapist to check for damage to your knee and surrounding muscles and ligaments.

What are common knee injuries when playing rugby?

Some common forms of injury while playing rugby league or rugby union include runner's knee, ACL and MCL tears and inflammation. Bauerfeind recovery knee braces help promote blood flow with the use of medical grade compression, something not found when using other neoprene sleeves and braces. Protect your knees so you can enjoy your next tackle, try, conversion or ruck.

How do I treat a rugby related knee injury?

We recommend visiting a physiotherapist for treatment and advice on treating common rugby injuries. They may recommend the following treatments.

  • Strains or Sprains. Many sprains and strains can be treated with the RICE method: Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. A good physiotherapist can assist with the recovery as well. If the strain is more severe it may require surgery.
  • Runner's Knee. This is the common name for patellofemoral pain syndrome. This is often due to abnormal mechanics caused by problems close to the knee, forcing the patella to bump against the femoral groove. We recommend speaking with a rugby specific physiotherapist, they will usually conduct a bio-mechanical review as well as assessing musculature.
  • Meniscal Tearing. Simple meniscal tears may be treated with the RICE method and anti-inflammatory medications. Advanced tears may require surgery. If you have lost some or all of your meniscus you may want to use a hinged knee brace like the GenuTrain S.
  • Ligament Tearing. Ligament tears generally always require surgery. A torn ligament rebuild uses a graft of tissue as the ligament will usually not heal properly otherwise. Surgery is often minimally invasive, however it can take time for a tear to repair.